Vaccine cultists try to explain away newly discovered link between flu shots and spontaneous abortions

A recent study published in the journal Vaccine showed that there was a “strong association” between repeated seasonal flu shots and miscarriages. For anyone skeptical of vaccines, this finding, while saddening, is not exactly surprising. Why wouldn’t injecting a pregnant woman with a toxic cocktail of viruses, adjuvants and mercury cause a miscarriage?

The flu shot is one of the only vaccines that still contains thimerosal, a compound that has faced (and deserved) a tremendous amount of scrutiny for the fact that it is approximately 50 percent mercury by weight.  On average, a flu shot can contain up to 25 micrograms of mercury — an amount that could be harmful to a child, never mind a still-developing fetus.  As Trace Amounts explains, a child would need to weigh about 550 pounds for the amount of mercury in a flu shot to be safe.

Overall, it really should come as no surprise that pregnant women who get the flu shot — especially those who seemingly get it every season — could be at an increased risk of having a miscarriage. And even though a recent study found that this correlation seems to exist, the scientists behind the study had no shortage of excuses to prop up the current recommendation that pregnant women should be inoculated anyways. Unsurprisingly, the damning research was funded by the Centers for Disease Control — and now, they’re trying to walk back the findings.

The study was a case-controlled study that took place over two flu seasons. As sources explain, “485 women who experienced spontaneous abortion, or miscarriage, were matched with those who delivered full-term live or stillbirths.” Lead author James Donahue, DVM, Ph.D., MPH, a senior epidemiologist at the Marshfield Clinic in Wisconsin, and his team wanted to determine if women were more likely to experience miscarriages within the first 28 days of being vaccinated. They reported that while there was no significant association seen if a woman didn’t get a vaccine the previous year — what they found in women who repeatedly got vaccinated each season was shocking, especially to the researchers.

Women who consecutively got flu shots each season were twice as likely to have a miscarriage — an undoubtedly troubling association.

Speaking about the findings, Donahue claims that there is “no biological basis” for their shocking discovery that women who got the flu vaccine were twice as likely to have a miscarriage. While you’d think a man with Donahue’s numerous titles would at least have a passing awareness of how hazardous mercury (and thimerosal) can be to the human body (let alone a developing fetus), apparently you’d be wrong. It seems the pharmaceutical industry’s dogmatic approach to thimerosal runs so strong in the mainstream scientific community, even common sense about known toxic compounds escapes them.

Other vaccine-pushing scientists have pointed to other details, like the fact that many miscarriages go unnoticed and therefore unreported, as potential “issues” with the findings. However, this argument does not address the fact that there were two groups in the study, and only those who got the flu shot repeatedly showed an increase in risk of losing the pregnancy. The scientists also suggested that it was possible that women who sought care for miscarriages were just more likely to also be vaccinated and claim this also could have produced bias within the study.

Ultimately, even in light of this frightening research, no changes to current policies regarding vaccinating pregnant women will be made — or even considered. What kind of a sham is that? While it’s obvious that science is often contradictory, pregnant women seem to be instructed to exercise caution in virtually every other aspect of their lives except for vaccines. What kind of hypocrisy is that? [Related: Read more stories about the dangers of inoculation at Vaccines.news]

Sources for this article include:

CIDRAP.UMN.edu

TraceAmounts.com

WashingtonPost.com

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